الاثنين، 6 أغسطس، 2012

'Total Recall' Box Office Numbers Fail To Beat 'The Dark Knight'

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Total Recall Colin Farrell
"Total Recall" fails to win the box office.
"Total Recall" took in $26 million at the box office this weekend, Sony reported, which wasn't nearly enough to outdo "The Dark Knight Rises."
The Christopher Nolan filmed earned $36.4 million in its third weekend,according to The Hollywood Reporter.
Sony projected $25 to $30 million for "Total Recall" in its opening weekend, but many box office observers thought the movie would bring in more than that, THR noted.
"Total Recall," starring Colin Farrell, Jessica Biel, Kate Beckinsale and Bryan Cranston, cost $125 million to make. The remake -- based on the '90 Paul Verhoeven film and Philip K. Dick's short story -- wasn't a hit with critics either.
"Since the new 'Recall' is totally witless, don't expect laughs. Originality and coherence are also notably MIA," Peter Travers of Rolling Stone wrote. "This 'Total Recall' will make you feel robbed as well. It's two hours you'll never get back and every minute is a bad memory."
Adding insult to injury? "Total Recall" only opened to about $1 million more than the original "Total Recall" did in 1990.
Of course, the film wasn't alone in its soft opening weekend: "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days" opened with $14.7 million at the box office, THR reports.
The London Olympics and the Aurora movie theater shooting are presumed to be two reasons why ticket sales are down this year.

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Nine Great American Companies That Will Never Recover: 24/7 Wall St.

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Bank Of America Countrywide
24/7 Wall St.: Many American companies have been lauded for their rapid rise to greatness, a process that sometimes takes less than a decade. These firms become leaders in their industries, are renowned for innovation, phenomenal growth, and, in the case of public corporations, their soaring share prices. Google Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) usually makes the list, as does Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL). At the other end of the scale are well-known firms that are so crippled they go bankrupt or disappear entirely. Recently, these have included AMR, the parent of American Airlines, Borders, and Eastman Kodak.
Somewhere in the middle — between the companies that do phenomenally well and those that fail — are ones that were once leaders in their industries but have fallen hopelessly behind. They may remain in business for years or even decades after their best days. Their executives struggle to find better strategies, and often their boards seek new management. But, in the case of companies that fall permanently into trouble and well behind the leaders in their industries, the chance of a turnaround has passed. Competitors have taken too much market share, and often have stronger balance sheets. Or, their products and services are no longer in demand because of changes in the overall economy or the sectors in which they operate.
To compile a list of names that were once leaders in their industries, but are no longer and likely will never be again, 24/7 Wall St. looked at companies that have lost most of their market share, suffered sharp share price erosion, and posted a sharp drop in earnings, or even losses. We focused on companies that are included in the S&P 500. Almost all have lost money recently. Each has had a drop in share price of over 50% in the last five years. Each has powerful competitors who have built market share or moats around their businesses that are nearly impossible to overcome.
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Sikhism: 5 Things To Know About The Sikh Religion

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Sikhism
In light of the tragic shooting at theWisconsin Sikh Temple, HuffPost Religion offers this brief introduction to Sikhism in hopes of increasing understanding and appreciations for this great world religion.
Sikhism is the fifth largest religion in the world with a population of upwards of 30 million worldwide. There are an estimated 250,000 Sikhs in the United States having first arrived in the late 19th century.
Below are five basic facts about Sikhism:
1. Belief: Sikhism is a monotheistic religion, and the basic Sikh belief is represented in the phrase Ik Onkar meaning "One God."
2. History: Sikhism was founded in the Punjab region in India in the 15th century by Guru Nanak Dev. Sikhism broke from Hinduism due, in part, to its rejection of the caste system.
3. Scripture: The primary source of Scripture for Sikhs is the Guru Granth Sahib, regarded as the living Guru, after the final Guru in human form, Guru Gobind Singh, passed away.
4. Place of worship: A Sikh place of worship is known as the gurdwara. The wordgurdwara means "doorway to God." Men and women normally sit apart in the gurdwara. Traditionally there is no official clergy within the Sikh tradition. Over time however, priests have become more commonplace. Many gurdwaras employ priests to conduct services, while many others are run entirely by members of the local congregation.
5. The Five Ks: The Five Ks are the articles of faith that Sikhs wear as ordered by the 10th Guru, Guru Gobind Singh. Most Sikhs wear one or more of the articles but only Sikhs who have taken amrit, a ritual analogous to baptism, wear all. They include:
  • Kesh, or unshorn long hair, which is protected by a dastaar, or turban. The dastaar is worn by men and some women to cover their long hair. But most women keep their hair long and uncovered, except for when entering a gurdwara.

  • kangha is a small wooden comb meant to keep the hair combed twice a day.

  • kara is an iron bangle to be worn on the hand used most.

  • kachera is a specific undergarment for men and women.
  • kirpan is a short dagger.

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Olympic Track: Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Wins Women's 100-Meter; Carmelita Jeter Wins Silver

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Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce
FILE: Jamaica's Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, left, and Trinidad's Semoy Hackett go to cross the finish line in a women's 100-meter heat during the athletics in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Friday, Aug. 3, 2012. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
LONDON -- Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica outleaned world champion Carmelita Jeter of the United States and finished in 10.75 seconds Saturday night to win her second consecutive 100-meter Olympic gold medal.
The last woman to win the dash twice in a row was Gail Devers of the U.S. in 1992 and 1996.
Running with a gold chain dangling around her neck, Fraser-Pryce delivered the second-fastest Olympic 100 in history to edge Jeter, whose time was 10.78. Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica, the 200 champion at the past two Summer Games, earned the bronze in 10.81.
The 5-foot-3 Fraser-Pryce has served a six-month doping suspension after taking a banned painkiller following a dental procedure.
She was the 2009 world champion in the 100.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.
LONDON (AP) – Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica won her second consecutive 100-meter Olympic gold medal by winning the final in 10.75 seconds.
The last woman to win the dash twice in a row was Gail Devers of the U.S. in 1992 and 1996.
Carmelita Jeter of the United States took the silver in 10.78. Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica earned the bronze.
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Michael Phelps Finishes London Olympics Program With Gold In 4x100-Meter Medley Relay

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Michael Phelps London Olympics 2012 Gold
Michael Phelps has left the pool.
Swimming the butterfly leg for the U.S. team in the men's 4x100-meter medley relay, Phelps has completed his program at the London Olympics -- and his swimming career -- with yet another gold medal. That makes 18 gold and 22 total medals over four career trips to the Olympics, including a pair of unprecedented individual three-peats. Having accomplished more than any other Olympian in history, the 27-year-old from Maryland is ready to walk away.
"I told myself I never want to swim when I'm 30," Phelps told reporters after his final race, making it clear that he won't be back in the pool for the 2016 Olympics. "No offense to those people who are 30, but that was something I always said to myself, and that would be in three years. I just don't want to swim for those three years."
Entering the London Olympics, the U.S. had never lost the 4x100-meter medley relay. The American team swam in the fourth lane after recording the fastest qualifying time (3:32.65). Turning over the team after that performance, the swimmers representing the U.S. in the final were among the most impressive of the London Games. Phelps swam the fly leg and was joined by Matt Grevers (who hadwon gold in backstroke), Nathan Adrian (who won gold in freestyle) and Brendan Hansen (who won bronze in the breaststroke). Not surprisingly, this star-studded quartet captured the gold medal, finishing in 3:29.35.
Leading off with the backstroke, Grevers staked the U.S. team to an early lead. Swimming second, Hansen swam the breaststroke but surrendered the lead to the Japanese team. The U.S. trailed only briefly, however, as Phelps grabbed first place back. In the anchor leg, Adrian extended the lead that Phelps' delivered. According toSwimming World, this was a "textile best" time for the men's 4x100-meter medley relay.
Japan took silver in 3:31.26 and Australia won the bronze, finishing in 3:31.58.
"I felt disappointed I couldn't give them a bigger lead, but I knew that with who was at the end of the relay it would be no problem," Grevers told Pat Forde of Yahoo!Sports. "This is a moment I won't forget – being on that award podium with Michael Phelps on his final relay. He's my swimming idol. The guy is just incredible."
Before the race, Grevers tweeted about his excitement to be swimming in the final race of Phelps' historic career.

While Phelps' epic 8-for-8 performance at the Beijing Olympics may never be equalled, his haul of four gold medals and two silvers in 2012 makes him both the most decorated Olympian of all time as well as of the 2012 Games to this point.

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Oscar Pistorius Makes Olympics History, Reaches Men's 400-Meter Semifinals (PHOTOS)

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Oscar Pistorius
Oscar Pistorius
LONDON -- It began with a smile at the starting line.
Moments later, Oscar Pistorius took off and the click-click-clicking of carbon on the track was all but drowned out by the 80,000 fans on hand to watch him make history Saturday. The first amputee to compete in track at the Olympics, Pistorius cruised past an opponent or two in the backstretch of his 400-meter heat, and by the end, the "Blade Runner" was coasting in for a stress-free success.
Typical. Except this time, it was anything but that.
"I've worked for six years ... to get my chance," said the South African, who finished second and advanced to Sunday night's semifinals. "I found myself smiling in the starting block. Which is very rare in the 400 meters."
Yes, this sun-splashed day at Olympic Stadium was a good one for Pistorius, a double-amputee who runs on carbon-fiber blades and whose fight to get to this point has often felt more like a marathon than a sprint. He walked out of the tunnel, looked into the stands, saw his friends and family there - including his 89-year-old grandmother, who was carrying the South African flag.
"It's very difficult to separate the occasion from the race," Pistorius conceded.
But he figured it out. He finished in a season-best time of 45.44 seconds, crossing the line and looking up at the scoreboard, then covering his face with his hands when he saw the capital "Q" - for qualifier - go up by his name.
"Couldn't have hoped for anything better," he said.
The 25-year-old runner was born without fibulas and his legs were amputated below the knee before he was a year old. His is one of those stories that is every bit as much about the journey - one part dramatic, another part inspiring and yet another part controversial - as the final result.
"I know Oscar was the protagonist in the race," said Luguelin Santos of the Dominican Republic, who actually won the heat by .4 but went virtually unnoticed. "But I love him. He's a good racer."
Erison Hurtault of Dominica, who trained with Pistorius in South Africa, agreed.
"One thing I can say about Oscar is he's an incredibly hard worker," Hurtault said. "I'm glad to see him out here. I'm glad he's getting a chance to finally compete and hopefully something emerges out of everyone else's mind."
Pistorius has four Paralympic gold medals, but this latest trip around the track is about something different.
He waged a long fight to run in the Olympics against able-bodied opponents.
After dozens of hearings in front of hundreds of men and women in suits charged with the task of deciding whether the blades gave Pistorius an unfair advantage - then getting his country's Olympic committee to accept his qualifying times and enter him into the games - Pistorius finally got his chance.
He shook hands with his opponents, crouched into the blocks, flashed that smile and then - in so many ways, it was just another race, with Pistorius among the fastest men in it.
"I just see him as another athlete, another competitor," world champion Kirani James said.
Bursting out of the crouch from Lane 6, Pistorius got going slowly, but built up steam in the backstretch. He made up the lag and was easily among the top three when the runners turned into the backstretch. He passed Russia's Maksim Dyldin and then, as all the top runners do in a 400 prelim, let off the gas over the final few meters to save energy for the next one.
Though he knows his personal-best of 45.07 seconds isn't fast enough to truly contend for a medal, Pistorius wants to be more than simply a set piece at these Olympics. His goal was to be a factor, to earn a spot in the semifinals, and he did that - something the defending champion in this event, LaShawn Merritt, did not.
"He's fought to get here. He's here. Great guy, friend of mine," said Merritt, who pulled up lame with an injured hamstring halfway through his race and won't get to face Pistorius on the track.
One man who might, Britain's Nigel Levine, is among those who sounded less than thrilled about all the hype over Pistorius, who will also compete for South Africa in the 4x400-meter relay next week.
"Ask him," Levine said when asked if Pistorius had an advantage. "I'll keep my opinion to myself on that one. It has nothing to do with me."
Advantage or no, getting to the semifinals was never a sure thing. Then again, there haven't been many sure things for the "Blade Runner" on this Olympic road. And so, he appreciates every moment.
"It sometimes difficult to think the athletes and the friends and family of those who are here really understand what it's about," Pistorius said. "To be out here and to know you sacrificed 'X' amount to achieve this is just really mind-blowing."
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McKayla Maroney Falls In Olympic Vault Final, Settles For Silver Medal (PHOTOS)

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Mckayla Maroney
Mc Kayla Maroney fails to land her dismount in the Artistic Gymnastics Women's Vault final on Day 9 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 5, 2012 in London, England.
McKayla Maroney is widely considered the best female gymnast in the world on the vault. Just ask her coach. Before thewomen's vault, U.S. coach Martha Karolyi was quite clear.
"She's the best," Karolyi told The Associated Press.
Over the long run, that may be true. But Maroney did not produce the best performance during the women's vault final at the London Olympics on Sunday. After posting the highest vault score during qualifying (by nearly half a point) and executing a breathtaking vault during the team finals, Maroney delivered a lackluster performance by her incredibly high standards. Of course, that was still good for the silver medal behind Sandra Raluca Izbasa of Romania.
After an impressive Amanar vault on her first attempt, the reigning world championfailed to stick the landing on her second attempt, falling down into a sitting position. Izbasa capitalized on the mistake, leaving the 16-year-old from California to settle for the silver medal.
"I didn't deserve to to win gold if I landed on my butt," Maroney told reporters after the competition, via USA Today. "I'm not disappointed about the silver, I'm disappointed about my performance."
With scores of 15.866 and 14.300, Maroney finished with an overall 15.083. Izbasa took gold with 15.191 while Maria Paseka of Russia won bronze with 15.050.
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Voter ID Laws Raise Debate Over Impact On Youth Vote

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Voter Id Laws
CHICAGO — Gone are the days when young voters weren't taken seriously. In 2008, they helped propel Barack Obama into the Oval Office, supporting him by a 2-1 margin.
But that higher profile also has landed them in the middle of the debate over some state laws that regulate voter registration and how people identify themselves at the polls.
Since the last election, Pennsylvania, Kansas, Wisconsin and Texas and other states have tried to limit or ban the use of student IDs as voter identification. In Florida, lawmakers tried to limit "third party" organizations, including student groups, from registering new voters.
Proponents of voter ID and registration laws say the laws are intended to combat voter fraud. The intent, they say, is to make sure people who are voting are who they say they are and have the right to vote.
"In this day and age, nothing could be more rational than requiring a photo ID when voters come to the polls," Pennsylvania's senior deputy attorney general, Patrick Cawley, said recently when defending the state's new law in court.
Others see these efforts as attempts to squelch the aspirations of the budding young voting bloc and other groups, and they're using that claim to try to get more young people fired up.
"You think your vote doesn't matter? Then why are they trying so hard to take it away from you?" asks Heather Smith, president of Rock the Vote, a group that works to register young voters. "It does demonstrate the power they have."
Smith notes that it's not just an issue for college students.
She was teaching a civics class for graduating seniors at an inner-city high school in Philadelphia this spring and asked how many among them had driver's licenses that could be used, if the Pennsylvania law requiring a photo ID to vote were to survive the legal challenge.

"They looked at me like I had two heads," she says. Only two students in the room of 200 raised a hand; few of the students had cars.
These are the sort of stories that have led some students to get involved, particularly on college campuses.
In Florida, Rock The Vote joined with the League of Women Voters to challenge restrictions on "third party" voter registration. A federal judge said last spring that many of the restrictions made it too difficult for legitimate voter registration organizations to do their work. During the fight, students at the University of Central Florida placed ironing boards around campus, a symbol that they were "pressing the issue."
Now, while most college campuses are relatively quiet, some of those students have taken it upon themselves to register their peers during freshman orientation this summer.
"We feel like it's up to us," says Anna Eskamani, a 22-year-old graduate student and a leader at the Florida school.
In Pennsylvania, when lawmakers were proposing the voter ID law there, 22-year-old Adam Boyer was among students who asked them to reconsider an outright ban on the use of student IDs.
"I'd like to think that the proponents of this law weren't trying to disenfranchise certain demographics. I hope it was an oversight on their part, and I think that was the case," says Boyer, a recent graduate of Penn State who plans to attend law school at Villanova this fall.
Pennsylvania lawmakers decided to allow "valid" student IDs, meaning they had to have expiration dates. But most colleges and universities in Pennsylvania didn't have such dates on their IDs.
So students and other groups that advocate for them have been working with universities in Pennsylvania and states such as Wisconsin to add them. A state judge struck down Wisconsin's voter ID law; that ruling is being appealed.
New IDs at institutions such as Penn State, for instance, now have expiration dates. Returning students also can get an expiration sticker to put on their IDs, a common plan at schools that are addressing the ID issue.
Joel Weidner, a Penn State official who helps oversee ID policy, says the school is most concerned about out-of-state students who might rely on a student ID to vote if they don't have a Pennsylvania driver's license. Of the 80,000 Penn State students on campuses statewide, he estimates that about 10,000 are from other states.
But in many instances, returning students still have to be aware that they need the expiration sticker and know where to get one.
"What we don't want to see is a school offering up a change to students but doing it quietly," says Dan Vicuna, staff attorney and campus vote project coordinator at the Fair Elections Legal Network in Washington. "We really hope it will be coupled with a real public awareness campaign."
Voter ID and registration aren't the only voting issues on campuses.
Long lines and a lack of polling places have been problems for students in past elections, particularly in 2008. So some universities are trying to get polling places on campus. Arizona State is among those that recently approached election officials and got one.
In Ohio, student groups are working with county officials to lengthen early voting
"Some have been more receptive to that than others," says Will Klatt, a recent graduate of Ohio University who is now a senior organizer for the Ohio Student Association.
All the rules, and the differences in them state to state and even county to county, can create a lot of confusion for young voters, some of whom are voting for the first time
In Wisconsin, during a gubernatorial recall election in June, the League of Women Voters received 200 calls from students who said voting requirements caused confusion at the polls. Many, the league said, left without voting. The confusion, in that instance, was over a requirement that Wisconsin voters live in a precinct for 28 days to be eligible to vote there. That's a tricky requirement for students, who are often mobile in the summer months.
Last year in Maine, groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union criticized Secretary of State Charlie Summers after he sent letters to out-of state students at four universities telling them they needed to register their vehicles in Maine and get driver's licenses there if they wanted to continue voting in the state. Some saw the move as voter intimidation and a violation of the Voting Rights Act, particularly because Summers found no evidence of voter fraud in an investigation that prompted the letters.
Summers' spokeswoman said the secretary of state had consulted with the Maine attorney general and "acted in accordance with all state and federal laws."
The U.S. Supreme Court has sided with students on this issue and their ability to vote where they attend school, even when they've come from another state.
"So students should be registering in the communities that they feel are home – whether that's their parents' home or their apartment or their dorm room," says Lee Rowland, counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a nonpartisan legal think tank in New York. "It is a constitutional right to vote."
To help them understand that right, she says the Brennan Center created an online guide for students with pages that detail voting rules and requirements in each state –http://bit.ly/Pl1pbE
It's not uncommon for out-of-state students to vote where they think their vote has the most impact. So if they attend a school in a swing state, they often vote there. It also can simply just be a matter of convenience, and a way to avoid going through the process of getting an absentee ballot.
Right now, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Kansas, Indiana and Georgia are among states with voter ID requirements in place. Tennessee is the only state that bans use of any student ID. Others limit use to state institutions and/or require proof that the ID is valid, such as the expiration date.
Wisconsin, Texas, South Carolina and Virginia are among states where voter ID laws are on hold due to legal challenges.
But will young people vote in November in the same numbers as they did in 2008?
Eskamani, the grad student in Florida, has noticed a lot of disillusionment among her peers over the economy and a political process they consider "anti-student."
"They feel beaten down," says Eskamani. "Instead of more passionate, I think sometimes they feel more frustrated."
Some think that frustration could fuel more involvement, especially as students return to campus this fall.
"My hope is that (voter ID and other laws) backfire and that young people find out and are annoyed by it – and that it motivates them more to get out and vote," says Tobin Van Ostern, policy manager for Campus Progress, a Washington-based group that works on voting rights and other issues relevant to students.
If that happens, Eskamani tells her peers, "WE will determine who the next president of the United States is."
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Mitt Romney Comments At Fundraiser Outrage Palestinians

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JERUSALEM -- Mitt Romney told Jewish donors Monday that their culture is part of what has allowed them to be more economically successful than the Palestinians, outraging Palestinian leaders who suggested his comments were racist and out of touch with the realities of the Middle East. Romney's campaign later said his remarks were mischaracterized.
"As you come here and you see the GDP per capita, for instance, in Israel which is about $21,000, and compare that with the GDP per capita just across the areas managed by the Palestinian Authority, which is more like $10,000 per capita, you notice such a dramatically stark difference in economic vitality," the Republican presidential candidate told about 40 wealthy donors who ate breakfast at the luxurious King David Hotel.
Romney said some economic histories have theorized that "culture makes all the difference."
"And as I come here and I look out over this city and consider the accomplishments of the people of this nation, I recognize the power of at least culture and a few other things," Romney said, citing an innovative business climate, the Jewish history of thriving in difficult circumstances and the "hand of providence." He said similar disparity exists between neighboring countries, like Mexico and the United States.
Palestinian reaction was swift and pointed.
"It is a racist statement and this man doesn't realize that the Palestinian economy cannot reach its potential because there is an Israeli occupation," said Saeb Erekat, a senior aide to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.
"It seems to me this man lacks information, knowledge, vision and understanding of this region and its people," Erekat added. "He also lacks knowledge about the Israelis themselves. I have not heard any Israeli official speak about cultural superiority."
As criticism mounted while Romney traveled to Poland, campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul said: "His comments were grossly mischaracterized." The campaign contends Romney's comparison of countries that are close to each other and have wide income disparities – the U.S. and Mexico, Chile and Ecuador – shows his comments were broader than just the comparison between Israel and Palestine.
At the White House, spokesman Josh Earnest said Romney's comments appeared to have left some people "scratching their heads a little bit."
"One of the challenges of being an actor on the international stage, particularly when you're traveling to such a sensitive part of the world, is that your comments are very closely scrutinized for meaning, for nuance, for motivation," he said.
Earnest sidestepped questions about whether Obama agreed with Romney's comments about culture, saying only that Obama believed economic issues are among the wide range of matters that would need to be addressed by the Israelis and Palestinians during peace talks.
While speaking to U.S. audiences, Romney often highlights culture as a key to economic success and emphasizes the power of the American entrepreneurial spirit compared to the values of other countries. But his decision to highlight cultural differences in a region where such differences have helped fuel violence for generations raises new questions about the former businessman's diplomacy skills.
As he has at home, Romney in Jerusalem cited a book titled, "Guns, Germs and Steel," that suggests the physical characteristics of the land account for the differences in the success of the people that live there.
"And you look at Israel and you say you have a hard time suggesting that all of the natural resources on the land could account for all the accomplishment of the people here," Romney said, before citing another book, "The Wealth and Poverty of Nations," by former Harvard professor David Landes.
This book, Romney said in Jerusalem, concludes that "if you could learn anything from the economic history of the world it's this: Culture makes all the difference. Culture makes all the difference."
The economic disparity between the Israelis and the Palestinians is actually much greater than Romney stated. Israel had a per capita gross domestic product of about $31,000 in 2011, while the West Bank and Gaza had a per capita GDP of just over $1,500, according to the World Bank.
Romney, seated next to billionaire casino owner Sheldon Adelson at the head of the table, told donors that he had read books and relied on his own business experience to understand why the difference in economic disparity between countries is so great.
His comparison of the two economies did not take into account the stifling effect the Israeli occupation has had on the Palestinian economy in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and east Jerusalem – areas Israel captured in 1967 where the Palestinians hope to establish a state.
In the West Bank, Palestinians have only limited self-rule. Israel controls all border crossings in and out of the territory, and continues to restrict Palestinian trade and movement. Israel annexed east Jerusalem in 1967, but has invested much less heavily there than in Jewish west Jerusalem.
And although Israel withdrew from the Gaza Strip in 2005, it continues to control access and has enforced a crippling border blockade since the Islamic militant Hamas seized the territory in 2007.
The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund have said the Palestinian economy can only grow if Israel lifts those restrictions.
"It's Israeli occupiers and Palestinians under occupation, and that's why Palestinians cannot realize their potential," Erekat said.
The breakfast with top donors – including New York Jets owner Woody Johnson and hedge fund manager Paul Singer – concluded Romney's visit to Israel, the second leg of a three-nation tour designed to bolster his foreign policy credentials.
Standing on Israeli soil for the first time as the GOP's presumptive presidential nominee, Romney on Sunday declared Jerusalem to be the Israeli capital and said the U.S. has promised never to "look away from our passion and commitment to Israel."
The status of Jerusalem is a critical issue in peace talks between the Israelis and the Palestinians.
In Israel, Romney did not meet with Abbas or visit the West Bank. He met briefly with Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad.
Romney's campaign says the trip, which began in England last week, is aimed at improving the former Massachusetts governor's foreign policy experience through a series of meetings with foreign leaders. The candidate has largely avoided direct criticism of U.S. President Barack Obama while abroad.
The Jerusalem fundraiser, however, was a political event that raised more than $1 million for Romney's campaign. It marks at least the second fundraiser during the tour. The first, in London, attracted about 250 people to a $2,500-per-person fundraiser.
Both candidates have aggressively courted American donors living abroad, a legal practice that has been used for decades.
Romney's declaration that Jerusalem is Israel's capital was in keeping with claims made by Israeli governments for decades, even though the United States, like other nations, maintains its embassy in Tel Aviv.
His remarks on the subject drew a standing ovation from the audience, which included Adelson, the American businessman who has promised to donate more than $100 million to help defeat Obama.
Romney flew to the Middle East from Britain, where he caused a stir by questioning whether officials there were fully prepared for the Olympic Games. A stop in Poland will complete his trip.
Four years ago, Obama visited Israel as a presidential candidate, part of a five-nation trip meant to establish his own foreign policy credentials.
Romney's stop in Israel also was designed to appeal to evangelical voters at home and cut into Obama's support among Jewish voters and donors. A Gallup survey of Jewish voters released Friday showed Obama with a 68-25 edge over Romney.
Romney and other Republicans have said Obama is insufficiently supportive of Israel.

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